Chai

Winter is well and truly upon us down here in Melbourne, and we can’t help but feel a little bit envious of those lucky people enjoying the warmth in the northern hemisphere.

Colourful enamel coated new pots have arrived and they are a quirky addition to our current range which we can not wait to share with you.

Meanwhile, if you love the flavour of Prana Chai, but find it doesn’t quite satisfy that Friday night need for a stiff drink – we have a couple of cocktail recipes that are just the thing for you! The imaginative bartenders at two of our favourite city bars have given a couple of classic cocktails a Prana Chai twist. Visit the bars to have them mixed by experts, or read on for the recipes to make them yourself at home.

After spending so much time at coffee festivals this year, we finally got to hangout with some of our own kind at the World Tea Expo in Las Vegas. While we know usually what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas, we were pretty excited about sharing Prana Chai with the Americans, and getting to see what else is going on in the world of tea.

This month we introduce you to Amelia, our hard working rep over in the West, and some of the new places you can get your cup of #onlythegoodstuff around the world. So settle in and catch up on all things chai!

Best!

Mario, Koray & Vincent


We have new starter packs with new enamel coated pots which come in two colours: Blue and White. Of course you still have the chance to opt for the original stainless steel pot.

You can check them out here.

 

Prana Chai Cocktails

Of course we all enjoy our Prana Chai and love a cup whenever we can, but sometimes even we need something a bit stronger. Lucky for us the creative bartenders at two of our favourite bars have come up with some delicious cocktails using #onlythegoodstuff as a key ingredient.

The Collection Bar Richmond Spiced Negroni

This classic Italian cocktail is spiced up with Prana Chai infused vermouth, adding new depth to the aromatic aperitif. Salute!

30ml Brookies Gin

30ml Campari

30ml Prana Chai infused Carpano Antica sweet vermouth

Stir ingredients together with ice to chill the spirits, then strain over fresh ice and garnish with an orange peel twist.

Chai Spiced Sweet vermouth:

1 bottle sweet vermouth, we prefer to use Carpano Antica

250 grams Prana Chai.

Steep Chai in vermouth overnight, fine strain after a 24 hour infusion.

Clove Sydney Hot Toddy

Perfect for warming us up this time of the year, the team at Clove Sydney have put a Prana Chai twist on the classic Hot Toddy. A far tastier concoction for a sore throat than Lemsip!

60ml Old Forester Bourbon

15ml Prana Chai sugar syrup

60ml hot water

Orange peel

3-4 cloves

1 cinnamon stick

Method: pour all the ingredients into the glass. Push the cloves in the orange peel and arrange with the cinnamon stick on the glass to garnish.

Have you got an imaginative way to use #onlythegoodstuff? Let us know and you could be featured in our newsletter!

 

Prana Chai at the World Tea Expo

After show-casing Prana Chai at various international coffee festivals this year, it was nice to be surrounded by other tea enthusiasts  at the World Tea Expo in Las Vegas last month. We joined hundreds of tea industry professionals, from 42 different countries, for three days dedicated to the world’s most popular hot drink. We brewed up many cups of #onlythegoodstuff to visitors from all over the world, and showed off our popular cold brew kit. It was an excellent opportunity to introduce Prana Chai to the growing US market and get inspired by what is going on out there in the world of tea. It got us thinking about that often overlooked ingredient to our Prana Chai...

Time for tea

With all the delicious spices that add the unique flavour to Prana Chai, the base ingredient can sometimes get forgotten about – tea. But there is way more to this leafy hot drink than that soggy old tea bag floating around in your cup of English Breakfast.

Native to Asia, tea has been drunk in China and Burma for centuries, before being introduced to the western world by the Dutch in the 17th century. Darjeeling tea, green tea, white tea, herbal tea…. It sure sounds like there are a lot of different teas out there. But actually, all tea comes from one plant, Camellia sinensis. How the tea differs and gets its name depends on how processed it is.

The colour of the final product is an indicator of the process it goes through – white tea is often merely the dried leaves of the plant, while black tea requires the highest level of oxidisation, which gives it its stronger flavour and colour. To tea nerds, herbal and fruit teas are not actually tea, but infusions or tisanes, as they are not derived from the tea plant. On top of all these varieties, there are also flavoured teas such as Earl Grey, which add another step to the process by flavouring the tea.

The Chinese originally drank tea as a medicinal drink, and it has been linked to some pretty impressive health benefits. Tea it is full of antioxidants which help in the fight against cancer and aging. Studies have also attributed drinking to preventing cognitive decline and neurodegeneration, and increased heart health. The good news is you don’t even have to have a five cup a day habit to enjoy the benefits. It seems that drinking at least one cup a day can increase the health of your heart.

All of this is good news for us Prana Chai drinkers, as Ceylon tea is a primary ingredient in #onlythegoodstuff mix. So make yourself up a cup of chai to start enjoying the benefits of this surprising leaf.

Meet the team – Amelia

Meet the team bringing Prana Chai to you! This week we head west to meet our hard working Account Manager in Western Australia – Amelia. She spent a lot of time working in hospitality at various venues around Perth where she developed her passion for the industry and fell in love with Prana Chai. She jumped at the opportunity to join our team and share Prana Chai with others, and now loves introducing people to the good stuff. She is pretty busy with work and studying at university, but loves to go out for breakfast, read and travel when she gets the chance. We are happy to have her on board as our energetic and enthusiastic representative in WA.

We would also like to introduce one of the newest members of the Prana Chai team – baby Shun! Everyone here at Prana Chai wishes to extend a very warm welcome to the youngest team member, and congratulate dad Kotaro and his wife for the arrival of their newborn son.


New places to get #onlythegoodstuff

Salt - Tokyo.

Prana Chai is not the only Australian import you will find in Tokyo. Famous Australian chef Luke Mangan opened his restaurant Salt here several years ago after successful expansion into the Asian market via Jakarta and Singapore. Home favourites feature strongly on his menu - think Tasmanian oysters and WA rock lobster - but have been tweaked to cater to the international market. And now he is bringing another Aussie favourite to Japanese diners, Prana Chai!   

Eat ‘n’ Mess - London

Remember when having a dietary requirement made eating out almost impossible? Now everywhere has gluten/dairy/sugar free options, it’s hard to recall a time when requesting these was met with nothing but a hateful look from your waiter. Fast forward several years and we now have great spots like Eat ‘n’ Mess, which not only caters for dietary requirements, but specialises in gluten and dairy free products. The creative presentation means everything looks almost too good to eat, and it tastes amazing too. Even those whose stomachs can handle anything will be adopting an intolerance for an excuse to visit here.      

Smak - Melbourne

It can be hard to stand out from the crowd of trendy cafes in Melbourne, especially if you go for a Scandinavian minimalist aesthetic as Smak have done in South Yarra. But the guys here have supported their attractive interior with an original, health driven menu, making it a hit with the locals. They are big on sourcing locally and sustainably (including Prana Chai) and the quality of dishes live up to the expectation set by its name - meaning “taste” in Norwegian.